The Muslim community in Uganda through one hundred and forty years: the trials and tribulations of a Muslim minority

Islam is now about one hundred and forty-five years old in Uganda. During this time, it has led to the evolution of a Muslim community and has left indelible marks on aspects of the Ugandan public in general. This discussion of the fortunes of the Muslim community in Uganda begins with an examination of the meaning of Islam in the traditional Ugandan setting. In the next section the following issues are considered: the way in which Muslims organized the propagation of their religion and the legacy it left behind; the challenge posed to Islam by the religions that came years later; the ‘mawlid’ as a factor in Muslim propagation. Next, attention is paid to Muslim education in Uganda, an area where Islam’s record continues to lag behind that of the other communities. Colonial administrators and Christian missionaries are mentioned as a factor in Muslim educational backwardness. Then the author examines conflicts within the Muslim community, the various ways in which the politics of the country have affected the trend of events in the Muslim community, the ambivalent role of Idi Amin and the implications of his reign for Muslims, the effect of Islam on the socioeconomic culture of Uganda, the position of women in Islam in Uganda, the attitude of the Ugandan mass media towards Islam, the connections of the Ugandan Muslim community with the Arab world, and the Muslim student movement in Uganda. Notes, ref.

Title:The Muslim community in Uganda through one hundred and forty years: the trials and tribulations of a Muslim minority
Author:Kiyimba, Abasi
Year:1990
Periodical:Journal of African Religion and Philosophy
Volume:1
Issue:2
Pages:84-120
Language:English
Notes:biblio. refs.
Geographic terms: Uganda
East Africa
Abstract:Islam is now about one hundred and forty-five years old in Uganda. During this time, it has led to the evolution of a Muslim community and has left indelible marks on aspects of the Ugandan public in general. This discussion of the fortunes of the Muslim community in Uganda begins with an examination of the meaning of Islam in the traditional Ugandan setting. In the next section the following issues are considered: the way in which Muslims organized the propagation of their religion and the legacy it left behind; the challenge posed to Islam by the religions that came years later; the ‘mawlid’ as a factor in Muslim propagation. Next, attention is paid to Muslim education in Uganda, an area where Islam’s record continues to lag behind that of the other communities. Colonial administrators and Christian missionaries are mentioned as a factor in Muslim educational backwardness. Then the author examines conflicts within the Muslim community, the various ways in which the politics of the country have affected the trend of events in the Muslim community, the ambivalent role of Idi Amin and the implications of his reign for Muslims, the effect of Islam on the socioeconomic culture of Uganda, the position of women in Islam in Uganda, the attitude of the Ugandan mass media towards Islam, the connections of the Ugandan Muslim community with the Arab world, and the Muslim student movement in Uganda. Notes, ref.