The Expansion and Adaptation of Fulbe Pastoralism to Subhumid and Humid Conditions in Nigeria

Recent studies indicate that the conventional stereotypes of the Fulbe as living in northern Nigeria and migrating between the semiarid north and the dry-season pastures along the Niger-Benue system are becoming less and less true. The gradual exploration of southern pastures has led to individuals remaining in these high-rainfall areas all year round. The author enumerates the factors that led to the southward movement of the Fulbe and describes the impact of this new migration pattern, which includes a movement to the towns of the traders and settled Fulbe. He explores the changes in ecological adaptations and discusses the patterns of conflict and cooperation in Fulbe interaction with local populations. He concludes that the present situation is unstable – conflict with settled cultivators in the south is likely to push back pastoralists who do not settle and adopt mixed farming – and damage to the ecology is likely to increase still further making ever-lower sustainable levels of production. Bibliogr., note, ref., sum. in French (p. 523).

Title:The Expansion and Adaptation of Fulbe Pastoralism to Subhumid and Humid Conditions in Nigeria
Author: Blench, Roger
Year:1994
Periodical:Cahiers d’tudes africaines
Volume:34
Issue:133-135
Pages:197-212
Language:English
Geographic terms: Nigeria
Northern Nigeria
External link:https://doi.org/10.3406/cea.1994.2047
Abstract:Recent studies indicate that the conventional stereotypes of the Fulbe as living in northern Nigeria and migrating between the semiarid north and the dry-season pastures along the Niger-Benue system are becoming less and less true. The gradual exploration of southern pastures has led to individuals remaining in these high-rainfall areas all year round. The author enumerates the factors that led to the southward movement of the Fulbe and describes the impact of this new migration pattern, which includes a movement to the towns of the traders and settled Fulbe. He explores the changes in ecological adaptations and discusses the patterns of conflict and cooperation in Fulbe interaction with local populations. He concludes that the present situation is unstable – conflict with settled cultivators in the south is likely to push back pastoralists who do not settle and adopt mixed farming – and damage to the ecology is likely to increase still further making ever-lower sustainable levels of production. Bibliogr., note, ref., sum. in French (p. 523).