The case against the CIA

American citizens may be less aware of the widening credibility gap the United States suffers in the Third World because its leaders have responded to repeated crises by mouthing benign platitudes about peace and humanity while secretly ordering the CIA to attempt violent solutions. At present there are over thirty CIA stations on the African continent a hundred case officers under official cover, and two dozen or so ‘outside’ case officers under non-official cover. The author advertises withdrawal of the CIA from Africa. Note.

Title:The case against the CIA
Author:Stockwell, John
Year:1979
Periodical:Issue
Volume:9
Issue:1-2
Pages:21-23
Language:English
Geographic term:Africa
Subject:CIA
External link:https://www.jstor.org/stable/1166936
Abstract:American citizens may be less aware of the widening credibility gap the United States suffers in the Third World because its leaders have responded to repeated crises by mouthing benign platitudes about peace and humanity while secretly ordering the CIA to attempt violent solutions. At present there are over thirty CIA stations on the African continent a hundred case officers under official cover, and two dozen or so ‘outside’ case officers under non-official cover. The author advertises withdrawal of the CIA from Africa. Note.