Small-scale industries in nigeria: their spatial and structural characteristics

Research on growth characteristics of industries in Nigeria has not yet paid sufficient attention to the impact on the country’s economy of the various industries by size of plant. Also, the spatial and structural characteristics of small-scale industries at the national level, and their role in national industrial policy and objectives, have not been as clearly analysed as have those of either the bigger plants or of manufacturing industries as a whole. The present study bridges these gaps, on the basis of data compiled from Nigeria’s ‘Industrial Directory’ (1975). Analysis indicates that the growth pattern of small-scale industries over time closely follows that of industries in general. The spatial and employment structures of small-scale industries are similar to those of manufacturing industry in general, albeit softer. Thus the distribution of small-scale industries is more even and Lagos is not the only focal point. Although small-scale industries have gone a long way towards helping Nigeria fulfill its industrial policy and objectives, a number of problems, such as poor infrastructure, low per capita income, inadequate technical and managerial skills, have to date prevented optimal results. Bibliogr.

Title:Small-scale industries in nigeria: their spatial and structural characteristics
Author:Oyebanji, J.O.
Year:1980
Periodical:The Nigerian Geographical Journal
Volume:23
Issue:1-2
Pages:99-111
Language:English
Geographic term:Nigeria
Subject:small-scale industry
Abstract:Research on growth characteristics of industries in Nigeria has not yet paid sufficient attention to the impact on the country’s economy of the various industries by size of plant. Also, the spatial and structural characteristics of small-scale industries at the national level, and their role in national industrial policy and objectives, have not been as clearly analysed as have those of either the bigger plants or of manufacturing industries as a whole. The present study bridges these gaps, on the basis of data compiled from Nigeria’s ‘Industrial Directory’ (1975). Analysis indicates that the growth pattern of small-scale industries over time closely follows that of industries in general. The spatial and employment structures of small-scale industries are similar to those of manufacturing industry in general, albeit softer. Thus the distribution of small-scale industries is more even and Lagos is not the only focal point. Although small-scale industries have gone a long way towards helping Nigeria fulfill its industrial policy and objectives, a number of problems, such as poor infrastructure, low per capita income, inadequate technical and managerial skills, have to date prevented optimal results. Bibliogr.