Redesigning the Apartheid Urban Center

Urban residential segregation has been a central pillar of apartheid in South Africa since the Group Areas Act of 1950, but some degree of reform is now widely expected. Possible directions of change are explored in relation to the following: 1) the less rigidly controlled pre-1948 ‘segregation city’; 2) the post-segregation experience of Windhoek, Namibia, and Harare, Zimbabwe; 3) official thinking in the face of increasing ‘de facto’ erosion of urban residential segregation and the likely directions of incremental reform; and 4) the major elements of long-term urban change in a genuinely postapartheid era. Notes, ref.

Title:Redesigning the Apartheid Urban Center
Author:Lemon, Anthony
Year:1989
Periodical: African Urban Quarterly (ISSN 0747-6108)
Volume:4
Issue:3-4
Period:August-November
Pages:304-313
Language:English
Notes:biblio. refs.
Geographic terms: South Africa
Zimbabwe
Namibia
Abstract:Urban residential segregation has been a central pillar of apartheid in South Africa since the Group Areas Act of 1950, but some degree of reform is now widely expected. Possible directions of change are explored in relation to the following: 1) the less rigidly controlled pre-1948 ‘segregation city’; 2) the post-segregation experience of Windhoek, Namibia, and Harare, Zimbabwe; 3) official thinking in the face of increasing ‘de facto’ erosion of urban residential segregation and the likely directions of incremental reform; and 4) the major elements of long-term urban change in a genuinely postapartheid era. Notes, ref.