Push and pull factors in the initiation and maintenance of home work in two Pretoria settlements

This paper challenges the assumption that the majority of home-based enterprise (HBE) workers are involuntary home workers. It uses evidence from research in two settlements in the formal township of Mamelodi, Pretoria, South Africa, to show that most people have chosen to operate a home-based enterprise as a career and home-based enterprises are more resilient than expected. But taking into account the reasons that some have closed and that there is unlikely to be an endless supply of jobs in this sector, how then should the State and civil society try to support home-based enterprises as a means of poverty alleviation through income generation? Greater diversity could be stimulated; the backward linkages of HBEs into the formal sector could be developed and strengthened; access to microfinance could be improved, as well as access to business training and skills; and levels of service in settlements are a key factor in stimulating HBEs. Bibliogr., note.

Title:Push and pull factors in the initiation and maintenance of home work in two Pretoria settlements
Authors: Napier, Mark
Mothwa, Mary
Year:2001
Periodical:Urban Forum
Volume:12
Issue:3-4
Pages:336-351
Language:English
Geographic term:South Africa
External link:http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s12132-001-0010-x.pdf
Abstract:This paper challenges the assumption that the majority of home-based enterprise (HBE) workers are involuntary home workers. It uses evidence from research in two settlements in the formal township of Mamelodi, Pretoria, South Africa, to show that most people have chosen to operate a home-based enterprise as a career and home-based enterprises are more resilient than expected. But taking into account the reasons that some have closed and that there is unlikely to be an endless supply of jobs in this sector, how then should the State and civil society try to support home-based enterprises as a means of poverty alleviation through income generation? Greater diversity could be stimulated; the backward linkages of HBEs into the formal sector could be developed and strengthened; access to microfinance could be improved, as well as access to business training and skills; and levels of service in settlements are a key factor in stimulating HBEs. Bibliogr., note.