National Urbanization Strategy and Socioeconomic Development of Zaire

This paper examines urbanization and the urban problems resulting from it in Zaire. Zaire’s urban population is increasing fast, and there is a high level of concentration of people and economic activities in the capital city of Kinshasa. As a possible solution to Zaire’s urban problems, the author advocates the linkage of the country’s urbanization strategy with an industrialization strategy. The latter should be designed in accordance with the spatial distribution of existing resources. For Zaire’s economy to grow, an ‘outward-oriented industrialization’ strategy is necessary, which consists of more local processing of raw materials for export while satisfying domestic consumption needs by ensuring enough local supply. A likely negative effect of this strategy (the concentration of industrial units and, consequently, of people in the province of Shaba, where the mineral raw materials are concentrated) would have to be counterbalanced by locating resource-based manufacturing industries destined for both local consumption and export in the agriculture-based north, northwest and east of the country. Furthermore, it is necessary to improve conditions in urban centres. In order to improve urban management, two factors must be considered: the training of skilled public workers, and the willingness of the central government to favour the establishment of autonomous local governments. Notes, ref., sum.

Title:National Urbanization Strategy and Socioeconomic Development of Zaire
Author:Mukoko, Samba
Year:1992
Periodical:African Study Monographs
Volume:14
Issue:1
Pages:23-37
Language:English
Geographic term:Congo (Democratic Republic of)
External link:http://jambo.africa.kyoto-u.ac.jp/kiroku/asm_normal/abstracts/pdf/ASM%20%20Vol.14%20No.1%201993/Samba%20MUKOKO.pdf
Abstract:This paper examines urbanization and the urban problems resulting from it in Zaire. Zaire’s urban population is increasing fast, and there is a high level of concentration of people and economic activities in the capital city of Kinshasa. As a possible solution to Zaire’s urban problems, the author advocates the linkage of the country’s urbanization strategy with an industrialization strategy. The latter should be designed in accordance with the spatial distribution of existing resources. For Zaire’s economy to grow, an ‘outward-oriented industrialization’ strategy is necessary, which consists of more local processing of raw materials for export while satisfying domestic consumption needs by ensuring enough local supply. A likely negative effect of this strategy (the concentration of industrial units and, consequently, of people in the province of Shaba, where the mineral raw materials are concentrated) would have to be counterbalanced by locating resource-based manufacturing industries destined for both local consumption and export in the agriculture-based north, northwest and east of the country. Furthermore, it is necessary to improve conditions in urban centres. In order to improve urban management, two factors must be considered: the training of skilled public workers, and the willingness of the central government to favour the establishment of autonomous local governments. Notes, ref., sum.