[-In]tangible Heritage, Humans and the Environment: An ethnographic account of the conservation of Chingoma Falls in South-eastern Zimbabwe

This study adopts a heritage site known as Chingoma Falls in Mudzami Community in southeastern rural Zimbabwe. Based on ethnographic data gathered between April 2015 and October 2018, the study hoped to understand the extent to which the concept of the imagined community helps explain the exclusion, by the government, of intangible heritage from communities in Zimbabwe. Personal observations, reflections and experiences gained while working as a heritage manager and later as an academic and a researcher in the field prompted me to carry out this study. It was during this period that I noticed an asymmetrical relationship between the government and local communities in heritage conservation. I realised that bad blood between the government and local communities stemmed from the heritage legislation which acknowledges the government as the sole legal custodian of heritage sites in Zimbabwe.

Title: [-In]tangible Heritage, Humans and the Environment: An ethnographic account of the conservation of Chingoma Falls in South-eastern Zimbabwe
Author: Mubaya, Raymond
Year: 2020
Pages: 265
Language: English
Type of thesis: Ph.D. dissertation (2020-03-06)
City of publisher: Tilburg
Publisher: Tilburg University
Geographic term: Zimbabwe
External link: https://research.tilburguniversity.edu/en/publications/e4a6576f-35c1-49e2-8af6-993f6dc54888
Abstract: This study adopts a heritage site known as Chingoma Falls in Mudzami Community in southeastern rural Zimbabwe. Based on ethnographic data gathered between April 2015 and October 2018, the study hoped to understand the extent to which the concept of the imagined community helps explain the exclusion, by the government, of intangible heritage from communities in Zimbabwe. Personal observations, reflections and experiences gained while working as a heritage manager and later as an academic and a researcher in the field prompted me to carry out this study. It was during this period that I noticed an asymmetrical relationship between the government and local communities in heritage conservation. I realised that bad blood between the government and local communities stemmed from the heritage legislation which acknowledges the government as the sole legal custodian of heritage sites in Zimbabwe.