Indirect political participation in two Sierra Leone chiefdoms

Attempts to show that the national leaders in Sierra Leone feared the implications of mass participation in politics. They coped with this fear by discouraging direct participation in national-level politics, and instead directed the energies and attention of the people into local-level politics. The result was that as regards the rural areas of Sierra Leone, that is in most of the country, the local inhabitants were only recruited indirectly into the central political life of the nation. Samu, the largest Chiefdom in Kambia West constituency, and Soa Chiefdom in Kono District provide examples of indirect political participation, whereby largely conservative national leaders manoeuvred to gain electoral support, while seeking to avoid the involvement of the ‘masses’ at the national level, which they regarded as a threat to their position. Notes.

Title:Indirect political participation in two Sierra Leone chiefdoms
Author:Minikin, Victor
Year:1973
Periodical:Journal of Modern African Studies
Volume:11
Issue:1
Pages:129-135
Language:English
Geographic term:Sierra Leone
Subject:popular participation
External link:https://www.jstor.org/stable/159876
Abstract:Attempts to show that the national leaders in Sierra Leone feared the implications of mass participation in politics. They coped with this fear by discouraging direct participation in national-level politics, and instead directed the energies and attention of the people into local-level politics. The result was that as regards the rural areas of Sierra Leone, that is in most of the country, the local inhabitants were only recruited indirectly into the central political life of the nation. Samu, the largest Chiefdom in Kambia West constituency, and Soa Chiefdom in Kono District provide examples of indirect political participation, whereby largely conservative national leaders manoeuvred to gain electoral support, while seeking to avoid the involvement of the ‘masses’ at the national level, which they regarded as a threat to their position. Notes.