An analysis of the population-food crop nexus in Ghana

The objective of this study is to determine the influence of population growth on food crop production in Ghana, with a view to making short-term projections on food self-sufficiency in the regions for 2010. The study assesses the trend and pattern of population growth in the country from 1960 to 2000, as well as projections for 2010, in ten administrative regions of Ghana, using population census data. In addition, it assesses crop production from 1960 to 2002, using data from the Ghanaian Ministry of Food and Agriculture and FAO. Predictions of the amount of food that would be required as a result of population growth have been computed for 2010, for certain crops in the Upper East and Upper West regions and at the national level, based on simple regression models and projected populations. Predictions show that maize, sorghum and millet production in Upper East, and sorghum production in Upper West, would have to increase by an annual rate of 6.3 percent, 0.9 percent, 6 percent and 10.5 percent respectively, in order to meet the needs of the projected population in 2010. At the national level, cocoyam and plantain production would have to increase by 1.9 and 12.7 percent per annum respectively. However, in 2000 groundnut production in the Upper East region exceeded what the population needed. Thus, assuming groundnut production decreased by an annual rate of 4.4, it could still be sufficient to sustain the population of the region until 2010. Recommendations conclude the paper. Bibliogr., sum. [Journal abstract]

Title:An analysis of the population-food crop nexus in Ghana
Author: Codjoe, Samuel N.A.
Year:2007
Periodical: Journal of Social Development in Africa (ISSN 1012-1080)
Volume:22
Issue:2
Pages:157-182
Language:English
Notes:biblio. refs., ills.
Geographic terms: Ghana
West Africa
Abstract:The objective of this study is to determine the influence of population growth on food crop production in Ghana, with a view to making short-term projections on food self-sufficiency in the regions for 2010. The study assesses the trend and pattern of population growth in the country from 1960 to 2000, as well as projections for 2010, in ten administrative regions of Ghana, using population census data. In addition, it assesses crop production from 1960 to 2002, using data from the Ghanaian Ministry of Food and Agriculture and FAO. Predictions of the amount of food that would be required as a result of population growth have been computed for 2010, for certain crops in the Upper East and Upper West regions and at the national level, based on simple regression models and projected populations. Predictions show that maize, sorghum and millet production in Upper East, and sorghum production in Upper West, would have to increase by an annual rate of 6.3 percent, 0.9 percent, 6 percent and 10.5 percent respectively, in order to meet the needs of the projected population in 2010. At the national level, cocoyam and plantain production would have to increase by 1.9 and 12.7 percent per annum respectively. However, in 2000 groundnut production in the Upper East region exceeded what the population needed. Thus, assuming groundnut production decreased by an annual rate of 4.4, it could still be sufficient to sustain the population of the region until 2010. Recommendations conclude the paper. Bibliogr., sum. [Journal abstract]